Mike Merisko

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Rena Nounen No. 16790 Member,Joined at 2016-10-01 11:15:33

  • Mike Merisko Recently Comments
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing the Right House Plan
  •   

      

      About the Author: Mike Merisko has been a carpenter for 26 years. Most of those years were spent in the homebuilding and remodeling industries. He was also in business as a carpentry and general contractor. While that is his forte, he also has experience in bridge building, commercial construction, and exhibit building which is how he earns his living these days. You can browse through articles by him and others at his website www.sawkerfs.com
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing the Right House Plan
  •   These are some of the important things you must consider. Building a new home the biggest investment you'll ever make. Doing a little homework will keep you from getting an unwanted surprise and wasting time and money on a plan you can't use.

      (c) 2005 Mike Merisko www.sawkerfs.com

      Article Source: http://www.articledashboard.com
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing the Right House Plan
  •   Some towns and subdivisions also have what are called covenants. These are rules that dictate what you can and cannot build. Some of these covenants might include the minimum square footage house you can build, brick or frame construction, minimum roof pitch, and types of building materials you are allowed to use.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing the Right House Plan
  •   With this information you will be able to determine the square footage of a house plan you can afford. If your budget is $200,000 and the cost per square foot is $100, then a 2,000 square foot home is in your budget($200,000/$100= 2,000).

      Another consideration is the size of the lot you intend on building your home. You don't want to invest in a blueprint for a house that won't fit on your lot. Check with your municipality or county on the distances you must have between the building and the lot lines. Most have rules on how much backyard you must have and how much your house must be set back from the street or building line.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Simple Layout and Framing of Walls
  •   Wall layout is a simple process and once you do it a coupletimes you'll see just how easy it is. It will become even moreclear if you also install the drywall or sheathing also. It canbe a nightmare if the layout is wrong and the edges of thematerial aren't breaking on the center of the studs.

      A certain amount of care and precision must be taken to avoidnot having material breaking in the studs.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Simple Layout and Framing of Walls
  •   If there are doors, windows or wall intersections in the wall,these get laid out first. Sixteen inch centers are then laidout. Door and window openings can be moved so its stud orcripple stud is on the 16 o.c. layout. This saves or eliminatesa stud.

      Framing follows the same rules. Frame wall intersections first,then door and window openings. It can be tough to frame theseitems if the wall studs are in the way.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Simple Layout and Framing of Walls
  •   The first step to laying out a wall is to find 2 straight 2x4sand cut them to the length of the wall. Your now ready for thestud layout. If your building perpendicular to an existing wall,lay the 2x4 plates next to each other and flush the ends. Hookyour tape measure on one of the plates and make your first markat 15 and 1/4". This will be the leading edge of your firststud. This puts the center of the stud at 16". Continue markingthe rest of the wall studs in the same manner. The next onewould be at 31 and 1/4", then 47and1/4", then 63 and 1/4" and soon. This puts the center of the studs at 32", 48", and 64". Mosttape measures have 16" centers highlighted in a color to makethis easier. Once you have your stud locations marked, use asquare (combination or speed) to draw a line across both plates.Put an "X" to the right side of this line. This indicates wherethe stud goes.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing Finish Materials When Building Your Own Home
  •   (c) 2006 Mike Merisko

    www.sawkerfs.com

      About the Author: Mike Merisko has been a carpenter for 26 years. Most of those years were spent in the homebuilding and remodeling industries. He was also in business as a carpentry and general contractor. While that is his forte, he also has experience in bridge building, commercial construction, and exhibit building which is how he earns his living these days. You can browse through articles by him and others at his website http://www.sawkerfs.com or visit his blog at http://www.sawkerfs.blogspot.com
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing Finish Materials When Building Your Own Home
  •   Once the painting is done, ordering appliances is in order. I know a guy who ordered his

    refrigerator for when the drywall was done so his favorite beverage was on hand as he worked

    on his new home.

      Having all the necessary materials on hand is important to keep your homebuilding project

    moving smoothly. If your trying to meet a deadline this becomes even more important. If your

    paying on a construction loan, ordering materials with plenty of lead time can save you money.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Mike Merisko › Choosing Finish Materials When Building Your Own Home
  •   Flooring is another item that should be considered once the rough carpentry is finished.

    You will want to make sure items such as carpeting, ceramic or quarry tile, laminate, hardwood,

    or vinyl flooring is available when you need them.

      Interior trim and millwork should be measured up for and ordered after the drywall is up.

    While the taping and painting is being done, your order can be run. Once the painting is done

    your order should be ready for delivery. Give this two to three weeks lead time.
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