Gil Strachan

Gil Strachan V1 [ Registered ]

Rena Nounen No. 25607 Member,Joined at 2016-10-01 15:35:51

  • Gil Strachan Recently Comments
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   "The Home Reference Book"

    You can probably find a home inspection for a little less than what we ask, but you probably won't find the Home Reference Book. A $60 value, this solutions-oriented reference tool comes free with every inspection we perform.It's the first tool you should have around the house![/i]
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   Copyright Gil Strachan - All rights reserved.

      [i]Gil Strachan is a professional home inspector, representing Electrospec Home Inspection Services in east-central Ontario, Canada since 1994. Visit http://www.allaroundthehouse.com to learn more about home inspections.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   ONE-TIME ONLY: Occuring only when very specific conditions exist. This type of leak may occur once in the life of the basement, or may occur every few years when the appropriate conditions exist. One-time leaks (somewhat of a misnomer as they can, and frequently do, occur more than once) are the hardest to identify, again unless an active leak is occuring at the time of observation.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   SEASONAL: Generally occuring only at time of peak rainfall or other surface run-off, usually in the spring or fall. Seasonal leakage is more difficult to identify unless the leak is actively occuring.

    What to look for: Stains on finished surfaces or stored items, rust on the bottom of appliances, raised storage.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   Different types of water ingress:

      PERSISTENT: Occuring frequently throughout the year. Persistant leakage will almost always leave noticeable signs and clues, whether the basement is finished or not.

      What to look for: Staining on the first 6-12 inches up from the slab, bubbling or peeling paint, effluorescence (white salts), damp musty smells.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   Poor grading promotes basement dampness.What's surprising, is that something as innocuous-looking as a low-lying flower bed can often be the major contributor to a wet-basement problem. Take a long, hard look around the house. Are the eves all fitted with evestroughing, and do the troughs drain freely into downspouts and discharge at least two meters away from the house? Has the backfill around the foundation settled? Any other low-lying areas? Watch where the water goes during a rain storm, or spring melt. If water drains from the street or other areas, towards your house, consider landscaping features which can guide the water away.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   In this day and age, we regard a dry basement as a reasonable expectation, but unfortunately, practice doesn't always follow design. Building a dry basement requires an effective drainage system and wall assemblies that are more or less water resistant. Now, what's under and around your house, barring any great re-constructive projects, is likely there to stay. So, the only realistic and cost-effective means of control that we have as homeowners (especially in older homes, without drainage systems) is to control run-off from on and around the house.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   If you do have water in your basement, I suggest that you research the circumstances thoroughly and have an unbiased professional diagnose the situation before taking any remedial action or beginning any work.

      DID YOU KNOW?

      Did you know that basement leaks are the number-one major complaint from new home owners? According to Ontario New Home Warranty Program (Tarion) statistics, the average basement develops two leaks in the first two years after completion. The notable areas are cracks, form tie holes, and honeycombing.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   Although a backed-up drain may appear to be a serious problem, the inconvenience of water coming into the basement can typically be prevented by the simple installation of a device called a backflow preventer or check valve. This device allows water to flow down the drain, but will not allow it to back up. Drains that have completely collapsed or are seriously blocked or deteriorated may need to be excavated and replaced.
  • 2 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Gil Strachan › Wet Basements
  •   Another potential source for water in a basement is from a drain backing up. This type of situation is generally unpredictable unless there is evidence of a previous occurance. Indications of potential problems are homes in older areas of a town or city, where the municipal system is smaller and where the home owners' drains may be somewhat restricted by soil, tree roots, or accumulation of debris. Large deciduous type trees located in the path of a drain system should be considered as a potential problem.
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