Fu Tung Cheng

Fu Tung Cheng V1 [ Registered ]

Rena Nounen No. 50838 Member,Joined at 2016-10-12 14:20:23

  • Fu Tung Cheng Recently Comments
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › How to Use Concrete in a Traditional Kitchen
  •   As they say, it's all in the details.

      Article Source: http://www.articledashboard.com

      

      

      Fu-Tung Cheng is an award-winning designer and author of bestselling book Concrete Countertops: Design, Forms, and Finishes for the New Kitchen and Bath (Taunton, 2002) and the new Concrete at Home (Taunton, 2005).
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › How to Use Concrete in a Traditional Kitchen
  • - Line the drain board into the sink with tile or marble.

      Now I wouldn't want to use all of the above accents - just enough to carry a complementary flavor to the Craftsman look and feel. The concrete itself is earthy enough to carry that load. It's up to you as a homeowner or designer to add the touch that personalizes and enhances the piece. In some cases, for instance, the overwrought "traditional English manor" kitchen, usually full of elaborate detailing, can use a touch of restraint - the concrete counter with a simple ogee edge detail and a complementary white porcelain farm sink might just be perfect.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › How to Use Concrete in a Traditional Kitchen
  • - Recess the appropriately sized or proportioned ceramic tiles with some embossing on them into the face of the countertop or into a cast backsplash.

      Allow the recess to be at least 1/4" in depth.

    - Mosaic tiles in groups of four separated by 1/8"-1/4" spacing could be placed on the countertop surface as inlaid "trivets" next to the stove burners. (In the mold, they would be placed face down on the bottom of the form.)
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › How to Use Concrete in a Traditional Kitchen
  • - Choose an earth tone color or natural gray. No bright colors.

    - Keep the front face, or thickness, of the countertop at a minimum of 2-1/2" up to 5".

    - Inset "panels" into the front face of the countertop to reflect the cabinet doors. These panels would be no deeper than 3/8" and would measure approximately 1/3" to the height of the front face, or
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › How to Use Concrete in a Traditional Kitchen
  •   Let's take a turn-of-century "Craftsman" style kitchen for a hypothetical example. The cabinets would most likely be frame-and-panel with flush inlay doorframes. There would be wood wainscoting in the dining area and perhaps tile around a single porcelain sink. The lighting fixtures might have beveled glass or echoes of Tiffany lamps. What concrete application would be appropriate in this situation? I would look into one or more of the following ideas in combination:
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › How to Use Concrete in a Traditional Kitchen
  •   A California cottage we recently renovated moved from "traditional" to "transitional." A large concrete curved wall and counter boldly separates the living room from the kitchen. Meanwhile, a stainless steel integral sink countertop straddles one wall- yet, by inlaying glass tiles into the backsplash and inserting a traditional plate holder in the cabinetry, enough balance is achieved to avoid a conflict of styles.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › Why Concrete
  •   With vertical treatments, concrete gives us an opportunity torecapture some of the feeling of the monolithic wall-the feelingof substance, of protection. Walls are also a great place toexplore form. A wall doesn't have to be flat or straight, butcan curve and undulate. It can be textured to be rough as stoneor smooth as glass.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › Why Concrete
  •   Because of its adaptability, concrete finds itself welcome inall areas of the home, especially in the kitchen and bath, butalso in fireplaces, patios, garden paths, or water features.Concrete can also be used as a floor material with enormouscreative advantages whether seeded, stained, stamped, broomed ordiamond-finished. It can be a sole performer or play thesupporting role to tile, mosaics, decorative aggregates, stone,wood, or metal. It is inexpensive, durable, noncombustible,impervious to decay, and also very effective for passive solargain in the right application.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › Why Concrete
  •   This invitation to imagine, play, and explore inevitably led meto experiment in my own kitchen, where concrete and I began whatis now our nearly two-decade dance. My first countertop was asingle piece containing 11 cubic feet of concrete. It weighednearly 1500 pounds and took 10 people-and 2 engine hoists-toturn it over once it had cured. We barely managed it, but thepiece came out beautifully and is still being put to good usetoday.
  • 1 Years Ago

    Comment to Topic Posted by Fu Tung Cheng › Why Concrete
  •   It first occurred to me to make a countertop out of concrete in1985, when a friend and I were hired to design and renovate aprofessor's house in the Berkeley Hills. He gave us a modestbudget and announced, "This is all I can afford to spend; dowhatever you want." Armed with this rare creative license (andplenty of youthful exuberance) we aimed to be as innovative aspossible.
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